Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 32 OF 63

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Options for minimizing environmental impacts of freshwater spill response.
Publisher National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Hazardous Materials Response & Assessment Division,
Year Published 1994
Stock Number PB95-142873
OCLC Number 34584911
Subjects Oil pollution of water--United States--Management--Handbooks, manuals, etc. ; Oil spills--United States--Management--Handbooks, manuals, etc. ; Inland navigation--Environmental aspects--United States--Handbooks, manuals, etc.
Internet Access
Description Access URL
ftp://ftp.library.noaa.gov/noaa_documents.lib/NOS/CZIC/3937.pdf
http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CZIC-td424-3-o684-1994/pdf/CZIC-td424-3-o684-1994.pdf
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
EJBM  TD424.3.O684 1994 Headquarters Library/Washington,DC 12/17/2004
ENAM  TD424.3.O684 1994 Region 7 IRC Library/Kansas City,KS 01/17/1997
Collation vii, 126, 4, 1 pages : illustrations ; 28 cm
Notes
"September 1994." Includes bibliographical references (pages A-1-A-4).
Contents Notes
Abstract -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction -- Summary of response methods and habitats -- Spill response methods for specific inland habitats -- Spill response methods -- Special considerations -- Appendices. "The American Petroleum Institute (API) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) jointly developed this guide as a tool for contingency planners and field responders to identify response techniques that have minimal ecological impacts and also minimize the impact of the oil. The guide provides information on 29 response methods and classifies their relative environmental impact for combinations of four oil types and twelve freshwater environments and habitats. Spill topics of special concern in freshwater settings are also discussed, including public health, conditions under which oil might sink in freshwater, oil behavior in ice conditions, permafrost, and use of firefighting foams."--Page vii.