Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 24 OF 121

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Correlation of Airway Resistance with Forced Random Noise Resistance Parameters.
Author Pimmel, R. L. ; Fullton, J. M. ; Ginsberg, J. F. ; Hazuch, M. J. ; Haak, E. D. ;
CORP Author North Carolina Univ. at Chapel Hill.;Health Effects Research Lab., Research Triangle Park, NC.
Year Published 1981
Report Number EPA-600/J-81-263;
Stock Number PB82-124280
Additional Subjects Respiration ; Aerosols ; Concentration(Composition) ; Noise(Sound) ; Reprints ; Airway resistance ; Plethysmography ; Methacholine compounds
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
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Status
NTIS  PB82-124280 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 06/23/1988
Collation 9p
Abstract
The correlation between airway resistance (RAW) measured in a plethysmograph and three respiratory resistance parameters measured by forced random noise was evaluated. Forced random noise resistance parameters were the average resistance between 5 and 9 Hz (R5-9), the average resistance between 20 and 24 Hz (R20-24), and the extrapolated resistance at 1 Hz (R1). The authors studied 22 healthy, nonsmoking subjects, 10 of whom had a history suggesting childhood asthma. Serial measurements were made after inhalation of aerosols containing increasing concentrations of methacholine to obtain increasing concentrations of methacholine to obtain data in various stages of bronchoconstriction. There was a broad range of responsiveness to methacholine; the ratio of the peak to base-line values of RAW ranged from 1.1 to 6.3. R1, R5-9, and R20-24 were related to RAW by linear regression analysis. R1, and R5-9 showed excellent correlation with RAW (r=0.93 and r=0.91, respectively); R20-24 showed much poorer correlation (r=0.62). The slopes of the regression equations for R1 and R5-9 were 1.56 and 0.51, respectively; thus neither provided an exact measure of RAW. The data appear to be consistent with a model in which most of the methacholine-induced increase in resistance occurred in the peripheral airways and only a small fraction in the central airway.