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OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Assessment of neurotoxicity using assays of neuronglia-localized proteins : chronology and critique /
Author O'Callaghan, J. P.
CORP Author Health Effects Research Lab., Research Triangle Park, NC. Neurotoxicology Div.
Publisher Health Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency,
Year Published 1991
Report Number EPA/600/D-91/126
Stock Number PB91-213587
Additional Subjects Neuroglia ; Toxicity ; Central nervous system ; Neurons ; Neuroregulators ; Toxic substances ; Test methods ; Messenger RNA ; Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis ; Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay ; Glial acidic fibrillary protein ; Encephalitogenic basic proteins ; Aging ; Hyperplasia
Holdings
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Status
NTIS  PB91-213587 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 01/01/1988
Collation 48 pages ; 28 cm
Abstract
The achievements in neuroscience research over recent years have greatly advanced the authors' understanding of nervous system structure and function. Yet, with each increment in knowledge, the realization of the overwhelming complexity of this organ system is evident. Gone are the days when the brain can be viewed as a complexly wired collection of a few neuronal cell types surrounded by an apparently inert contingent of supporting glia. It is now known that neurons exist in a seemingly endless array of subtypes, each of which has been revealed by the presence of an identifying constituent. Classically, these cell type 'markers' took the form of specific neurotransmitter/neuromodulator candidates. More recently, these neuron-specific tags have grown to encompass an enormous number of well characterized peptides and macromolecules. That glia also exist as a large collection of specific subtypes, each with a potentially unique function, has only recently been appreciated. These recent advances in neuroscience have now enabled scientists to utilize nerve cells and neuroglia and their associated proteins, to develop meaningful neurotoxicological assays and methods of studying important neuroregulators.
Notes
"EPA/600/D-91/126." Microfiche.