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RECORD NUMBER: 6 OF 29

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Beta Adrenergic Control of Macromolecule Synthesis in Neonatal Rat Heart, Kidney and Lung: Relationship to Sympathetic Neuronal Development.
Author Slotkin, T. A. ; Whitmore, W. L. ; Orband-Miller, L. ; Queen, K. L. ; Haim., K. ;
CORP Author Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC. Dept. of Pharmacology.;Health Effects Research Lab., Research Triangle Park, NC.
Publisher c1987
Year Published 1987
Report Number EPA-R-813769; EPA/600/J-87/517;
Stock Number PB90-232182
Additional Subjects Nucleic acids ; Heart ; Kidney ; Lung ; Nerve cells ; Sympathetic nervous system ; Biochemistry ; In vivo analysis ; Graphs(Charts) ; Norepinephrine ; Proteins ; Deoxyribonucleic acids ; Ribonucleic acids ; Reprints ; Beta adrenergic receptors ; Newborn animals ; Isoproterenol
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NTIS  PB90-232182 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 08/27/1990
Collation 11p
Abstract
The sympathetic nervous system has been hypothesized to coordinate the timing of cellular development in peripheral tissues. In the study, the relationships among the ontogeny of sympathetic projections to peripheral organs, the patterns of macromolecule synthesis in those organs and the reactivity of synthetic processes to beta adrenergic stimulation by isoproterenol were evaluated. The major developmental rise in norepinephrine concentration and turnover, as well as in numbers of beta receptors, occurred during the second to fourth postnatal weeks in renal and lung sympathetic pathways and slightly earlier in the cardiac-sympathetic axis. The developmental decline in DNA synthesis in heart, kidney and lung coincided with the maturation of sympathetic projections. Direct stimulation of beta receptors by the in vivo administration of isoproterenol caused acute reductions in DNA synthesis in an age-dependent manner. In the heart, isproterenol was first able to suppress DNA synthesis at 5 days of age and a maximal effect was seen at 9 days; this early phase was characterized by a rapid time constant of coupling of beta receptors to the DNA effect (maximal effect at 6 h after isoproterenol). Reactivity was lessened by 12 days of age and thereafter displayed a longer time constant (maximal effect at 12-24 h). (Copyright (c) 1987 The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.)