Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 10 OF 35

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Factors Influencing the Residential Utilization of Reservoir Shorelands in the Southeast.
Author Burby, II, Raymond J. ; Donnell, Thomas G. ; Weis, Shirley F. ;
CORP Author North Carolina Water Resources Research Inst., Raleigh.
Year Published 1970
Report Number Rept. no. ;44; DI-14-10-0001-1935; OWRR-B-012-NC; 04934,; B-012-NC(6)
Stock Number PB-197 731
Additional Subjects ( Recreational facilities ; Land development) ; ( Multiple purpose reservoirs ; Sites) ; ( Residential buildings ; Shores) ; Fiscal policies ; Utilization ; Land use ; Residential buildings ; Local government ; Identifying ; Water resources ; Shores ; North Carolina ;
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB-197 731 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 06/23/1988
Collation 32p
Abstract
For local governmental units to participate effectively in the provision of public recreation facilities at multipurpose reservoir projects, private recreational investment must supplement existing local fiscal resources. Recreational residential development offers one important means of achieving this end, but reservoir shoreline development tends to be unevenly distributed in the Southeast. Before residential investment prospects can be incorporated into water resource project planning, factors influencing variation in reservoir shoreline development should be identified and evaluated wherever possible. Analysis of data from 74 multipurpose reservoir projects in the Southeast indicates that the residential use of water projects is primarily a function of various aspects related to the size of a project, the number and affluence of people living nearby (within 25 miles), and the visual attractiveness of the project. Considering the extent of taxable private shoreline investment as a criterion, local provision of public recreational facilities seems to be feasible for larger reservoirs located within relatively populous and affluent jurisdictions. (Author)