Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 365 OF 844

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Final Sampling Report for the Study of Personal CO (Carbon Monoxide) Exposure.
Author Whitmore, R. W. ; Jones, S. M. ; Rosenzweig, M. S. ;
CORP Author Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC.;Environmental Monitoring Systems Lab., Research Triangle Park, NC.
Year Published 1984
Report Number EPA-68-02-3679; EPA-600/4-84-034;
Stock Number PB84-181957
Additional Subjects Carbon monoxide ; Dosimetry ; Public health ; Households ; Air pollution ; Sampling ; Exposure ; Revisions ; Performance evaluation ; Colorado ; Methodology ; Personal exposure monitors ; Indoor air pollution ; Occupational safety and health ; Denver(Colorado) ; District of Columbia ; Monitors
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB84-181957 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 06/23/1988
Collation 90p
Abstract
This report describes the sample selection procedures used for a study funded by the EPA and conducted by the Research Triangle Institute in 1982 and 1983 to evaluate methodology for collecting data on personal exposure to carbon monoxide (CO). These data were collected in the metropolitan areas of Denver, Colorado and Washington, D.C., using personal exposure monitors (PEMs) and activity diaries. This involved telephone screening of households and selection of household respondents for personal exposure monitoring in the metropolitan areas in and around Denver, Colorado and Washington, D.C. Data on CO breath levels were also collected in Washington, D.C. (PEDCo Environmental conducted the field work in Denver.) The target population in both cities consisted of the non-institutionalized, non-smoking adults (ages 18 to 70) of these metropolitan areas. Based on the experience gained during the study, the methodology developed, with some modifications, may be used effectively in other areas of the country for collecting PEM data. These modifications should make the methodology more cost effective, improve the response rate, and lead to more accurate activity information.