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RECORD NUMBER: 92 OF 104

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Soil Filter: A Treatment Process for Removal of Odorous Gases.
Author Carlso, Dale A. ; Gumerma, Robert ; Leise, Curtis ;
CORP Author Washington Univ., Seattle. Dept. of Civil Engineering.
Year Published 1970
Report Number FWPCA-WP-00883-03; 12039,; 17020-02/70
Stock Number PB-202 580
Additional Subjects ( Odor control ; Sewage treatment) ; ( Gas filters ; Soils) ; ( Hydrogen sulfide ; Adsorption) ; ( Thiols ; Adsorption) ; Filtration ; Moisture content ; Materials recovery ; Design criteria ; Methane ; Microorganisms ; Loams ; Clay soils ; Sand filters ; Fluid flow ; Surface chemistry ; Soil filters
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
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Status
NTIS  PB-202 580 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 06/23/1988
Collation 107p
Abstract
While the removal of odors emitted from various locations in sewage collection systems by pumping the gases through a soil filter has been well documented, the actual removal mechanisms remained to be established. The experiments performed involved variation of the average particle size and moisture content of the filters, and further experiments were also performed with sterile soil. It was determined that the soil filter was particularly effective in the removal of polar gases such as hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan from waste streams. At hydrogen sulfide concentrations in excess of 100 mg/l the biological removal mechanisms were not significantly operative, and chemical removal mechanisms appeared to prevail. In dry sterile soil, adsorption coupled with surface catalysis reactions were found to be the predominant mechanisms for removal. For low gas concentrations (less than 100 mg/l H2S) the biological removal mechanisms were predominant and wet soil was preferred. Moist loam soil was able to remove 100% of a 775 mg/l mercaptan, in quantities of .85 liter per cu. ft. of soil/week. Methane was not removed in any case. With proper design and care, soil filters operated in a range favorable for the growth of microorganisms can be operated indefinitely.