Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 29 OF 104

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title ECO Update: Selecting and Using Reference Information in Superfund Ecological Risk Assessments. Volume 2, Number 4, September 1994.
CORP Author Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Emergency and Remedial Response.
Publisher Sep 94
Year Published 1994
Report Number EPA/540/F-94/050;
Stock Number PB94-963319
Additional Subjects Superfund ; Habitats ; Volatile organic compounds ; Water pollution effects ; Wildlife ; Streams ; Organic sulfides ; Inorganic sulfides ; Sediments ; Organic matter ; Sampling ; Soil properties ; Soil chemistry ; Moisture content ; Particle size ; pH ; Texture ; Cation exchanging ; Species diversity ; Abundance ; Bioindicators ; Rocky Mountain Arsenal ; Denver(Colorado)
Internet Access
Description Access URL
http://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=10001UTE.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB94-963319 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 11/11/1994
Collation 6p
Abstract
The Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA), located north of Denver, CO, is a large (27 sq mi.) Superfund site composed of many habitats. To meet specific sampling needs, investigators selected several smaller reference areas representing specific habitats at RMA. The Wellington Wildlife Refuge, for example, more than 50 miles north of RMA, was selected for collecting mallard ducks, mallard eggs, cottontail rabbits, mule deer, and prairie dogs for chemical analyses. And investigators selected land five miles away as a reference site for soils because it was composed of the same soil type as that found at RMA. Investigators should try to match soil characteristics--such as particle size distribution, organic matter content, hydrologic regime, and pH--as closely as possible. For example, organic matter content, pH, and texture determine a soil's cation exchange capacity, or its ability to adsorb positively charged ions such as H(+), Mg(+2), or Cd(+2). These cations may include pollutants as well as nutrients.