Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 32 OF 33

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Transit bus load-based modal emission rate model development {electronic resource} /
Author C. FENG ; R. GUENSLER ; M. Rodgers
Other Authors
Author Title of a Work
Feng, Chunxia.
Guensler, Randall
Rodgers, Michael.
Kimbrough, Sue
CORP Author Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta. School of Civil and Environmental Engineering.; Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Air Pollution Prevention and Control Div.
Publisher United States Environmental Protection Agency, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Air Pollution Prevention and Control Laboratory,
Year Published 2007
Report Number EP-05C-000033; EPA/600/R-07/106
Stock Number PB2008-108876
OCLC Number 213442810
Subjects Diesel motor exhaust gas--Mathematical models ; Buses--Environmental aspects--Mathematical models
Additional Subjects Emission ; Buses ; Transit industries ; Air pollution ; Diesel engines ; Vehicles ; Fuel consumption ; Oxides ; Nitrogen ; Particulates ; Metropolitan areas ; Greenhouse effect ; Gasoline ; Toxicity ; Mobile sources
Internet Access
Description Access URL
http://www.epa.gov/nrmrl/pubs0705.html
http://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=P1008QE2.PDF
http://www.epa.gov/nrmrl/pubs/600r07106/600r07106.htm
http://www.epa.gov/nrmrl/pubs/600r07106/600r07106prelthruchap8.pdf
http://www.epa.gov/nrmrl/pubs/600r07106/600r07106chap9thru14.pdf
http://smartech.gatech.edu/handle/1853/14583
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB2008-108876 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 10/16/2009
Collation {151, 168} p. : digital, PDF files
Abstract
Heavy-duty diesel vehicle (HDDVs) operations are a major source of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions in metropolitan areas nationwide. Although HD-DVs constitute a small portion of the onroad fleet, they typically contribute more than 45% of NOx and 75% of PM onroad mobile source emissions (U.S. EPA 2003). HDDV emissions are a large source of global greenhouse gas and toxic air containment emissions. Over the last several decades, both government and private industry have made extensive efforts to regulate and control mobile source emissions. The relative importance of emissions from HDDVs has increased significantly because today's gasoline powered vehicles are more than 95% cleaner than vehicles in 1968.
Notes
"EPA/600/R-07/106." "July 2007." "Contract no: EP-05C-000033."
Contents Notes
Heavy-duty diesel vehicle (HDDV) operations are a major source of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions in metropolitan areas nationwide. HDDVs typically contribute more than 45 percent of NOx and 75 percent of PM on-road mobile source emissions. HDDV emissions are a large source of global greenhouse gas and toxic air containment emissions. The relative importance of emissions from HDDVs has increased significantly; today's gasoline-powered vehicles are more than 95 percent cleaner than vehicles in 1968. In current regional and micro-scale modeling conducted in every state except California, HDDV emission rates are taken from EPA's MOBILE 6.2 model. EPA is currently developing a new set of modeling tools for the estimation of emissions produced by on-road and off-road mobile sources. The new Multi-scale mOtor Vehicle and equipment Emission System, known as MOVES, is a modeling system designed to better predict emissions from on-road operations. This research is to develop a new heavy-duty vehicle, load-based modal, emission rate model that overcomes some of the limitations of existing models and emission rates prediction methods. This model is part of the proposed Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicle Modal Emission Modeling (HDDV-MEM), which was developed by Georgia Institute of Technology. HDDV-MEM differs from other proposed HDDV modal models in that the modeling framework first predicts second-by-second engine power demand as a function of vehicle operating conditions and then applies brake-specific emission rates to these activity predictions.