Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 47 OF 280

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Chesapeake Bay living resources 1995-96 : living resources subcommittee biennial report /
CORP Author Environmental Protection Agency, Annapolis, MD. Chesapeake Bay Program.
Publisher Printed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for the Chesapeake Bay Program,
Year Published 1997
Report Number EPA 903-R-97-005; CBP/TRS-165/97
Stock Number PB97 155410
OCLC Number 37437486
Subjects Natural resources--Chesapeake Bay (Md. and Va.) ; Chesapeake Bay (Md. and Va.)
Additional Subjects Natural resources management ; Chesapeake Bay ; Coastal water ; Fishery management ; Aquatic ecosystems ; River basins ; Marine fishes ; Aquatic plants ; Graphs(Charts) ; Biological indicators ; Birds ; Restoration ; Regions ; Abundance ; Spatial distribution ; Biomass ; Shellfish ; Reefs ; Waterfowl ; Raptors ; Submerged aquatic vegetation
Internet Access
Description Access URL
http://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=2000W18L.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
EJAD  EPA 903/R-97-005 2 copies Region 3 Library/Philadelphia, PA 08/08/2008
EJBD ARCHIVE EPA 903-R-97-005 Headquarters Library/Washington,DC 06/13/2011
EJDD  CB 00731 OASQA Library/Fort Meade,MD 08/15/1997
NTIS  PB97-155410 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 09/08/1997
Collation 17 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
Abstract
Many Living Resources Subcommittee projects matured during 1995 and 1996, with several stream restoration projects hitting the ground. Watershed groups in Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Virginia started planting trees and assessing natural resources. Throughout the watershed, the opening of 13 blockages that prevented migratory fish from miles of fish habitat were opened during 1995 and 1996. Wild weather dominated 1996. Huge floods in January and September poured debris, sediment, and nutrients into Chesapeake Bay. One positive effect of the flooding was low salinity, which kept oyster diseases in check.
Notes
"EPA 903-R-97-005." "CBP/TRS 165/97." "February 1997."