Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 2 OF 10

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Global Climatic Issues in the Coastal Wider Caribbean Region.
Author Gable, F. J. ; Gentile, J. H. ; Aubrey., D. G. ;
CORP Author Environmental Research Lab., Narragansett, RI. ;Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, MA. Coastal Research Center.
Publisher c1989
Year Published 1989
Report Number EPA/600/J-90/245 ;ERLN-1210;
Stock Number PB91-116939
Additional Subjects Climatic changes ; Coasts ; Caribbean Sea ; Meteorological data ; Oceanographic data ; Legislation ; Glaciation ; History ; Paleoclimatology ; Weather forecasting ; Climate ; Ocean temperature ; Mathematical models ; Soil erosion ; Hurricanes ; Tropical storms ; Magnitude ; Social effect ; Global warming ; Wetlands ; Tourism
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB91-116939 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 03/04/1991
Collation 12p
Abstract
Interest among public, governmental, and scientific, communities about 'global' climatic warming and the associated meteorological and oceanographic effects, is a topic of very considerable concern (McElroy, 1989; Mitchell, 1989). During the past several years, numerous national and international scientific committees have addressed this problem, as have newspapers and popular magazines. Government-sponsored legislation, particularly in the United States (for example, see Wirth, 1989), has been introduced to deal with the causes of 'global' climate change. Changes in climate are the norm when one studies the history of the Earth. These changes include the glacial epochs and the contemporary climatic variation of the El Nino/Southern Oscillation. Examination of palaeoclimatic records illustrate considerable natural and spatial variability which makes long-term (20-100 years) forecasting of climate change highly uncertain. Future climate (and arguably the present), however, will be influenced by Man-induced as well as natural processes. Together, these factors will cause future climate to evolve in uncertain ways.