Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 30 OF 36

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Regression using "hockey stick" functions /
Author Hasselblad, Victor. ; Creason, John P. ; Nelson., William C.
Other Authors
Author Title of a Work
Creason, John P.
Nelson, William C.
CORP Author Health Effects Research Lab., Research Triangle Park, N.C.
Publisher U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, Health Effects Research Laboratory ; NTIS [distributor],
Year Published 1976
Report Number EPA/600-1-76-024
Stock Number PB 253 576
OCLC Number 10829556
Subjects Biometry--methods.
Additional Subjects Air pollution ; Regression analysis ; Dosage ; Least squares method ; Analysis of variance ; Probit analysis ; Hockey stick functions
Internet Access
Description Access URL
https://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=2000Y53N.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
EIAD  EPA-600/1-76-024 Region 2 Library/New York,NY 06/27/2003 DISPERSAL
EJBD ARCHIVE EPA 600-1-76-024 Headquarters Library/Washington,DC 09/14/2010
EJBD  EPA 600-1-76-024 Headquarters Library/Washington,DC 05/22/2014
EKAM  EPA 600/1-76-024 Region 4 Library/Atlanta,GA 03/28/1998
EKBD  EPA-600/1-76-024 Research Triangle Park Library/RTP, NC 06/06/2003
NTIS  PB-253 576 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. 01/01/1988
Collation ii, 12 leaves : illustrations ; 28 cm.
Abstract
The establishment of criteria for air pollutants requires that a threshold level be established below which no adverse health effects are observed. Since standard dose response curves, such as the logit or probit, assume an effect at all levels, a segmented function was developed. This function has zero slope up to a point, and then increases monotonically from that point. Thus the name hockey stick function. The increasing portion need not be linear; any function that can be fitted by least squares techniques will work. A method for computing confidence intervals is also given. Since the curve can be used as a dose response curve, some comparisons are made with the more conventional probit and logit curves. In general, the fit of the hockey stick curve is as good as either the logit or probit curve, even when the data originate from a logit or probit distribution.
Notes
"June 1976." "EPA/600-1-76-024." Includes bibliographical references (page 9).