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RECORD NUMBER: 26 OF 113

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Development of a breadboard CO2 laser photoacoustic toxic vapor monitor : project summary /
Author Loper, G. L. ; Corbin, R. C. ; Takayama, M. L. ; Clifton, R. A. ; Gelbwachs, J. A. ;
Other Authors
Author Title of a Work
Loper, G. L.,
Corbin, R.C.,
Takayama, M.L.,
Clifton, R.A.,
Gelbwachs, Jerry A.,
Beck, S.M.,
Jackson, Merrill D.,
CORP Author Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
Publisher U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Air and Energy Engineering Research Laboratory, Center Environmental Research Information
Year Published 1988
Report Number EPA/600-S7-88-011
Stock Number PB93-222628
OCLC Number 896391392
Subjects Air--Pollution--United States--Measurement. ; Detectors. ; Air--Pollution--Measurement.
Additional Subjects Toxic substances ; Air pollution monitors ; Vapors ; Hazardous materials ; Air samplers ; Photoacoustic spectrometers ; Carbon dioxide lasers ; Chemical analysis ; Threshold limit values
Internet Access
Description Access URL
https://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=2000TJY4.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
EJBD ARCHIVE EPA 600-S7-88-011 In Binder Headquarters Library/Washington,DC 12/04/2018
EJBD  EPA 600-S7-88-011 In Binder Headquarters Library/Washington,DC 12/18/2018
EKBD  EPA-600/S7-88-011 Research Triangle Park Library/RTP, NC 10/24/2017
NTIS  PB93-222628 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 04/04/2019
Collation [2] pages ; 28 cm.
Abstract
The report describes the development of a breadboard version of CO2 laser photoacoustic detector. The CO2 laser photoacoustic technique has been demonstrated to be capable of detecting, with high specificity, a variety of toxic compounds a low parts-per-billion (ppb) levels in multicomponent air samples. The technique can be used for monitoring trace levels of various hazardous compounds in ambient air samples.
Notes
"EPA/600-S7-88-011." "November 1988."
Contents Notes
This report describes the development of a breadboard version of COb2s laser photoacoustic detector. The COb2s laser photoacoustic technique has been demonstrated to be capable of detecting, with high specificity, a variety of toxic compounds a low parts-per-billion (ppb) levels in multicomponent air samples. The technique can be used for monitoring trace levels of various hazardous compounds in ambient air samples. Key achievements during the program included: (1) The determination of COb2s laser absorption cross-section data or seven compounds of EPA concern that are volatile constituents of hazardous chemical waste. These data show that the laser photoacoustic method could detect these compounds in the ambient air at levels well below their most stringent threshold limit values. (2) the development of an acoustic-frequency-tracking device that allows the use of a resonant photoacoustic cell for the first time under field conditions of changing temperature and humidity. (3) The identification of nonadsorptive materials for use in air sampliong[sp] lines and for coating the cell's interior to minimize sample adsorption and reaction losses. (4) The development of a pyro-electronic device that automatically determines the wave-length of a COb2s laser transition. This device allows laser-wavelength selection to be under closed-loop control. (5) the placement of the breadboard detector under microcomputer control such that all wavelength selection and the calculation and display of the unknown concentrations of the gases in the air sample are automatic. (6) the analysis of laboratory-prepared air mixtures to determine the performance capability of the instrument. Experiments on the laboratory-prepared mixtures showed that the fully automatic breadboard instrument can detect hydrazine, a toxic rocket fuel used by the Air Force, at concentrations as low as 5 ppb in the presence of three interfering gases at concentrations as much as 600 times greater.