Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 12 OF 13

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Innovative Technology Verification Report: Technologies for Monitoring and Measurement of Dioxin and Dioxin-Like Compounds in Soil and Sediment. Xenobiotic Detection Systems, Inc., CALUX (Trade Name) by XDS.
CORP Author Battelle, Columbus, OH.;Environmental Protection Agency, Las Vegas, NV. National Exposure Research Lab.
Publisher Mar 2005
Year Published 2005
Report Number EPA-68-C-00-185; EPA/540/R-05/001;
Stock Number PB2005-108386
Additional Subjects Innovative technologies ; Verification ; Dioxins ; Soils ; Sediment ; Demonstration project ; Pollution control ; Performance ; Cost ; Evaluation ; Tests ; Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
Internet Access
Description Access URL
http://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=30006DVO.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB2005-108386 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 07/12/2006
Collation 114p
Abstract
A demonstration of technologies for determining the presence of dioxin and dioxin-like compounds in soil and sediment was conducted under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation Program in Saginaw, Michigan, at Green Point Environmental Learning Center from April 26 to May 5, 2004. This innovative technology verification report describes the objectives and the results of that demonstration, and serves to verify the performance and cost of the Xenobiotic Detection Systems, Inc., CALUX by XDS. Four other technologies were evaluated as part of this demonstration, and separate reports have been prepared for each technology. The objectives of the demonstration included evaluating the technology's accuracy, precision, sensitivity, sample throughput, tendency for matrix effects, and cost. The test also included an assessment of how well the technology's results compared to those generated by established laboratory methods using high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The demonstration objectives were accomplished by evaluating the results generated by the technology from 209 soil, sediment, and extract samples. The test samples included performance evaluation (PE) samples (i.e., contaminant concentrations were certified or the samples were spiked with known contaminants) and environmental samples collected from 10 different sampling locations.