Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 44 OF 56

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Report on the progress of regulations to protect stratospheric ozone : report to congress /
CORP Author Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Toxic Substances.
Publisher Environmental Protection Agency,
Year Published 1982
Report Number EPA 560/1-82-003
Stock Number PB82-194036
OCLC Number 14364741
Subjects Air Pollutants--adverse effects ; Atmosphere ; Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated--adverse effects ; Hydrocarbons, Fluorinated--adverse effects ; Ozone
Additional Subjects Ozone ; Air pollution ; Regulations ; Stratosphere ; Aerosols ; Monitoring ; Forecasting ; Chlorine organic compounds ; Fluorine organic compounds ; Freons ; Clean air act amendments of 1977
Internet Access
Description Access URL
http://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=9100BIWX.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
EJED  EPA 560/1-82-003 OCSPP Chemical Library/Washington,DC 05/21/1999
NTIS  PB82-194036 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 01/01/1988
Collation 18 p. ; 28 cm.
Abstract
As mandated by Section 155 of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977, EPA has submitted to Congress in February 1982, a report on the progress of regulation to protect stratospheric ozone covering the period from August 1979 to December 1981. The report reviews activities related to the production of stratospheric ozone from potential depletion due to emissions of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and other ozone-depleting substances. Although the 1978 EPA & FDA regulations prohibited the manufacturing and processing of CFCs for non-essential aerosol uses, anticipated market growth in some non-aerosol uses may eventually offset the reductions achieved by the aerosol rule. In addition to CFCs, other potential ozone depleting substances are being investigated by EPA and other agencies. At the international level Japan and the European Economic Community have limited CFC-11 and CFC-12 production capacity to present levels while several nations are assessing the feasibility of reducing emissions from other uses. EPA and other Federal agencies will continue to monitor and support research to improve our understanding of atmospheric, health & environmental science of ozone depletion, technological capabilities and costs for limiting CFC emissions. Any decision regarding EPA action would be based on an evaluation of all these factors.