Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 1140 OF 1245

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Technology Evaluation Report: SITE (Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation) Program Demonstration Test International Waste Technologies In situ Stabilization/Solidification Hialeah, Florida, Volume 1.
Author Sawyer, S. ;
CORP Author Foster Wheeler Enviresponse, Inc., Edison, NJ.;Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk Reduction Engineering Lab.
Publisher Jun 89
Year Published 1989
Report Number EPA-68-03-3255; EPA/450/5-89/004A;
Stock Number PB89-194161
Additional Subjects Hazardous materials ; Waste disposal ; Earth fills ; Stabilization ; Solidification ; Field tests ; Performance evaluation ; Cost analysis ; Leaching ; Permeability ; Additives ; Industrial wastes ; Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation Program ; Remedial action ; Land pollution ; Technology utilization ; Hialeah(Florida) ; Polychlorinated biphenyls ; Volatile organic compounds ; Heavy metals
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB89-194161 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 12/18/1989
Collation 105p
Abstract
A demonstration of the International Waste Technologies (IWT) process utilizing the Geo-Con, Inc., deep-soil-mixing equipment occurred in April 1988 at the site of a General Electric Co., electric service shop in Hialeah, FL where the soil contained polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and localized concentrations of volatile organics and heavy metal contaminants. The demonstrated process mixed the contaminated soil in-situ with a mixture of a proprietary additive, called HWT-20, and water. The technical criteria used to evaluate the effectiveness of the IWT process were contaminant mobility, based on leaching and permeability tests; and the potential integrity of solidified soils, based on measurements of physical and microstructural properties. The performance of the Geo-Con deep-soil-mixing equipment was also evaluated. The process did appear to immobile PCBs. However, because of very low PCB concentrations in the leachates, caused in part by the low concentrations of PCBs in the untreated and treated soils, absolute confirmation of PCB immobilization in the SITE project was not possible. The cost per ton of treating contaminated soil under the demonstration test conditions was determined at approximately $194.