Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 52 OF 83

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Introduction to artificial ground-water recharge /
Author Pettyjohn, Wayne A.,
CORP Author Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Laboratory.; National Water Well Association.
Publisher Robert S Kerr Environmental Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ; National Water Well Association,
Year Published 1981
Report Number EPA/600/2-81/236
Stock Number PB82-128810
OCLC Number 07985725
Subjects Artificial groundwater recharge. ; Water, Underground--Artificial recharge ; Injection wells ; Water supply ; Water wells ; Water storage ; Yield ; Stream flow ; Waste water reuse ; Irrigation ; Cooling water ; Recharge wells ; Salt water intrusion ; Subsidence ; Fluid infiltration ; Ditches ; Flooding ; Channel improvements ; Feasibility ; United States
Additional Subjects Water, Underground--Artificial recharge ; Ground water recharge ; Injection wells ; Water supply ; Water wells ; Water storage ; Yield ; Stream flow ; Waste water reuse ; Irrigation ; Cooling water ; Recharge wells ; Salt water intrusion ; Subsidence ; Fluid infiltration ; Ditches ; Flooding ; Channel improvements ; Feasibility ; United States ; Artificial recharge ; Water reuse
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
EJBD  EPA 600/2-81/236 Headquarters Library/Washington,DC 02/22/2002
ELBD RPS EPA 600-2-81-236 repository copy AWBERC Library/Cincinnati,OH 06/21/2017
EMBD  EPA/600/2-81/236 GWERD Library/Ada,OK 05/24/1996
EOAD  #00005418 Region 8 Technical Library/Denver,CO 01/01/1988 DISPERSAL
NTIS  PB82-128810 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 01/01/1988
Collation v, 44 pages : illustrations, maps ; 28 cm.
Abstract
Artificial ground-water recharge has been practiced for scores of years throughout the world. The purpose of artificial recharge is to increase the rate at which water infiltrates the land surface in order to supplement the quantity of ground water in storage. A variety of recharge techniques are feasible. Examples given in the report include methods that increase well yields, reduce the rate of decline of ground-water levels, reduce land subsidence, control seawater intrusion in coastal areas, and renovate wastewaters. Two broad types of artificial recharge are water spreading and well systems. In the former, large areas of land may be flooded, basins constructed, ditches or furrows excavated, or existing stream channels modified. Water is diverted to these structures where it infiltrates. Examples of successful recharge projects in the United States are given in the report.
Notes
Includes bibliographical references (pages 43-44).
Contents Notes
Groundwater and Artificial Recharge -- Artificial Recharge Considerations and Methods -- Selected Recharge Facilities and Experimental Sites in the United States.