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RECORD NUMBER: 18 OF 29

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title In hot water : water management strategies to weather the effects of global warming /
Other Authors
Author Title of a Work
Nelson, Barry.
Publisher Natural Resources Defense Council,
Year Published 2007
OCLC Number 154356100
Subjects Water-supply--West (U.S.)--Management. ; Global warming--Environmental aspects--West (U.S.) ; Climatic changes--Environmental aspects--West (U.S.)
Internet Access
Description Access URL
http://www.nrdc.org/globalWarming/hotwater/contents.asp
Online version http://worldcat.org/oclc/154356100/viewonline
http://digitalarchive.oclc.org/request?id%3Doclcnum%3A154356100
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
ERAM  TD223.6 .I6 2007 Region 9 Library/San Francisco,CA 11/30/2009
Collation x, 79 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 28 cm.
Notes
"July 2007." Includes bibliographical references (p. 74-79).
Contents Notes
Executive summary -- 1. An overview of major scientific findings on climate change -- 2. How climate change will affect Western water supply and management -- 3. The water and energy connection -- 4. A guide for water managers : designing a comprehensive response to climate change -- 5. Conclusions and recommendations -- Appendix A. Case studies : water agency action on climate change -- Appendix B. Decoupling population growth and water use -- Endnotes. "Drought and dry conditions withering the western United States are likely to persist and intensify, jeapordizing [sic] the region's water supply and water quality, compromising the health of rivers and lakes, and increasing the risk of flooding for Western communities. As stewards of these scarce resources, water managers can lead the response to the effects of global warming on water in the West. This NRDC report breaks new ground by analyzing the effects of global warming on a full range of water management tools and offering recommendations to meet the challenge. As the hotter, drier weather already afflicting the region becomes more common, officials responsible for keeping the taps flowing will need to take bold measures now, including conservation and efficiency, and supporting measures to control and reduce global warming in the future"--NRDC Web site.