Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 112 OF 309

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Feasibility of using fiber optics for monitoring groundwater contaminants
Author Hirschfeld, T. ; Deaton, T. ; Milanovich, F. ; Klainer, S. M.
Other Authors
Author Title of a Work
Hirschfeld, Thomas.
CORP Author Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA. ;S.T.E. Technical Services, Inc., San Ramon, CA.;Environmental Monitoring Systems Lab., Las Vegas, NV.
Publisher Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ;
Year Published 1984
Report Number EPA-600/7-84-067
Stock Number PB84-201607
OCLC Number 11516942
Subjects Fiber optics ; Water, Underground--Pollution
Additional Subjects Water pollution ; Ground water ; Water analysis ; Potable water ; Water quality ; Feasibility ; Optical spectrometers ; Fiber optics ; Fluorimetry ; Design criteria ; Performance evaluation ; Remote sensing ; Economic analysis ; Fluorescence ; Solid waste disposal ; Hazardous materials ; Chemical analysis ; Laser spectroscopy ; Laser induced fluorescence
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
EMBD  EPA/600/7-84/067 GWERD Library/Ada,OK 10/27/1995
NTIS  PB84-201607 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 01/01/1988
Collation viii, 82p. : ill. ; 28cm.
Abstract
The report contains the results of the initial feasibility study for a research program undertaken to develop the technology needed to use fiber optics for monitoring groundwater contaminants. The technology appears especially well suited to the requirements of detection monitoring where a few indicator parameters can be measured continuously by sensors placed down small-diameter monitoring wells. Data are generated at a remote, centrally located fluorimeter, connected to the sampling sites by inexpensive optical fibers. The analytical method is laser-induced fluorescence which gives the desired sensitivity. The optrode, a chemical system and/or a mechanical device at the distal end of a fiber optic, furnishes the needed specificity. Various fiber and optrode configurations have been evaluated and their applications to groundwater monitoring are discussed. Feasibility is shown for physical measurements such as temperature, pressure and pH. Chemical detection and quantification of the actinides, inorganic and organic chlorides, sulfates, alcohols, aldehydes, pesticides and tracer materials are presented. Finally, it is shown that the need for smaller diameter wells (as compared to conventional sampling methods), and the ability to make up to 50 unattended in situ measurements, using a reasonably priced centralized fluorometer system connected to the sampling sites by inexpensive optical fibers, results in acceptable economy.
Notes
"June 1984"