Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 22 OF 373

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Air Quality Data Analysis System for Interrelating Effects, Standards, and Needed Source Reductions: Part 8. An Effective Mean O3 Crop Reduction Mathematical Model.
Author Larsen, R. I. ; Heck, W. W. ;
CORP Author Environmental Sciences Research Lab., Research Triangle Park, NC. ;North Carolina State Univ. at Raleigh.
Year Published 1984
Report Number EPA/600/J-84/214;
Stock Number PB85-157071
Additional Subjects Ozone ; Mathematical models ; Plants(Botany) ; Standards ; Concentration(Composition) ; Exposure ; Air pollution ; Farm crops ; Reprints ; Air quality ; Air pollution effects(Plants) ; Air pollution sampling ; Natural emissions
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB85-157071 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 06/21/1988
Collation 15p
Abstract
A plant injury mathematical model, applied previously to acute and chronic leaf injury data, is used here to model National Crop Loss Assessment Network (NCLAN) data for 15 cultivars and to calculate species parameters from the cultivar analyses. Percent crop yield reduction is estimated as a function of a new parameter, the effective mean O3 concentration, where C(sub h) is the hourly average ambient O3 concentration for each daytime hour (defined here as 9:00 A.M.-4:00 P.M., always standard time) of data available at an air sampling site for summer (defined here as June 1-August 31), n is the total number of such available hours, and v is an exposure time-concentration parameter, calculated here to be approximately -0.376. Crop yield reductions for seven plant species are estimated for each of the 1824 siteyears of 1981-1983 hourly O3 concentration data available in the National Aerometric Data Bank (NADB). State-average O3 parameters and estimated percent crop yield reductions are tabulated. Ambient O3 concentrations reduced the total U.S. crop yield an estimated 5% for years 1981-1983.