Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 139 OF 799

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Carbon monoxide measurements in the vicinity of sports stadiums /
Author Bach, W. D. ; Crissman, B. W. ; Decker, C. E. ; Minear, J. W. ; Rasberry., P. P.
Other Authors
Author Title of a Work
Bach, W. D.
CORP Author Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, N.C.;Air Pollution Technical Information Center, Research Triangle Park, N.C.;Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, N.C. Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards.
Publisher Air Pollution Technical Information Center,
Year Published 1973
Report Number EPA 450/3-74-049; EPA-68-02-1096; APTIC-75057
Stock Number PB-250 850
OCLC Number 33323936
Additional Subjects Air pollution ; Urban areas ; Stadiums ; Parking facilities ; Carbon monoxide ; Measurement ; Monitoring ; Exhaust gases ; Concentration(Composition) ; Pennsylvania ; Georgia ; Standards ; Traffic surveys ; Recreational facilities ; Pittsburgh(Pennsylvania) ; Atlanta(Georgia) ; National ambient air quality standards ; Air quality data
Internet Access
Description Access URL
http://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=2000Z8HF.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
EJAD  EPA 450/3-74-049 Region 3 Library/Philadelphia, PA 09/27/1997
EKBD  EPA-450/3-74-049 Research Triangle Park Library/RTP, NC 09/19/2003
ERAD  EPA 450/3-74-049 Region 9 Library/San Francisco,CA 01/28/2013
ESAD  EPA 450-3-74-049 Region 10 Library/Seattle,WA 03/23/2010
NTIS  PB-250 850 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 01/01/1988
Collation 1 v.
Abstract
Monitoring studies of ambient CO concentrations in the vicinity of major league baseball stadiums in Pittsburgh and Atlanta were conducted for approximately 1 week in each location. Wind speed and direction were also recorded on the site. Traffic was monitored for 1-hour periods before and after games. Grab samples of CO were also obtained during the one hour periods before and after games. No violations of the 1-hour national ambient air quality standard for CO were observed. Highest concentration occurred immediately after the games. Traffic was observed to clear out within about 30 minutes after a game. Some of the data suggest that a less efficient system of traffic controls may result in violations of the 1-hour national ambient air quality standard in certain locations.
Notes
"July 1973."