Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 25 OF 107

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Environmental endocrine disrupters : an evolutionary perspective /
Other Authors
Author Title of a Work
Guillette, Louis J.,
Crain, D. Andrew,
Publisher Taylor & Francis,
Year Published 2000
OCLC Number 41548332
ISBN 1560325712; 9781560325710; 9780203362808; 0203362802
Subjects Endocrine disrupting chemicals. ; Reproductive toxicology. ; Endocrine toxicology. ; Environmental toxicology. ; Endocrine System--drug effects. ; Reproduction--drug effects. ; Environmental Exposure--adverse effects. ; Endokrinopathie ; Umweltkrankheit ; Toxicologia ambiental. ; Environmental Pollutants--adverse effects
Internet Access
Description Access URL
Publisher description http://catdir.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0743/99035847-d.html
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
EKBM  RA1224.2.E68 2000 Research Triangle Park Library/RTP, NC 03/24/2006
EKCM  RA1224.2.E68 2000 CEMM/GEMMD Library/Gulf Breeze,FL 08/24/2001
ELBM  RA1224.2.E68 2000 AWBERC Library/Cincinnati,OH 12/16/2019
ELDM  RA1224.2.E68 2000 CCTE/GLTED Library/Duluth,MN 09/22/2000
Collation x, 355 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Notes
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Contents Notes
"Environmental Endocrine Disrupters presents the latest research in reproductive toxicology. This book focuses on endocrine disruption by contaminants in humans, other mammals, and other vertebrates. Specifically, it addresses the problem of endocrine disrupting contaminants (EDCs) from an evolutionary comparative perspective. It provides a background on the evolution of the vertebrate endocrine system, as well as the evolution of vertebrate systems associated with lipid storage and utilization. (Many EDCs are stored in and released from fat stores.) Specific aspects of the EDC problem include effects on the reproductive, immune, and nervous systems and Guillette also examines the liver and thyroid. Each chapter explores the evolution of endocrine signaling and the comparative nature of the supporting data and separates the role of EDCs in adults from developing embryos."--Jacket.