Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 18 OF 29

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Low NOx Strategy for Combusting High Nitrogen Content Fuels.
Author Srivastava, R. K. ;
CORP Author Acurex Corp., Research Triangle Park, NC. Environmental Systems Div.;Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
Publisher Jan 90
Year Published 1990
Report Number EPA-68-02-3988; EPA/600/7-90/002;
Stock Number PB90-155664
Additional Subjects Air pollution control ; Nitrogen oxides ; Waste disposal ; Fuels ; Combustion chambers ; Burners ; Combustion efficiency ; Boilers ; Quality control ; Performance evaluation ; Design criteria ; Pilot plants ; Natural gas ; Cocombustion ; Staged combustion ; Incineration ; Lowest achievable emission rate
Internet Access
Description Access URL
https://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=P100VR84.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB90-155664 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 06/15/1990
Collation 72p
Abstract
The report gives results of an evaluation of a multistaged combustion burner (designed for in-furnace NOx control and high combustion efficiency) for high nitrogen content fuel and waste incineration application in a 1.0 MW package boiler simulator. A low NOx precombustion chamber burner has been reduced in size by about a factor of two (from 600 to 250 ms first-stage residence time) and coupled with air staging, resulting in a three-stage configuration, and natural gas fuel staging, yielding up to four stoichiometric zones. Natural gas, doped with ammonia to yield a 5.8% fuel nitrogen content, and distillate fuel oil, doped with pyridine to yield a 2.0% fuel nitrogen content, were used to simulate high nitrogen content fuel/waste mixtures. Under the conditions tested, net chemical destruction of NO via reburning does not seem to be evident. This may be due to the existence of rather low primary NO concentrations before the application of reburning. However, a beneficial dilution caused by reburning may provide lower NO emissions.