Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 294 OF 1066

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Duty Cycle Effects on Small Engine Emissions.
Author Gabele, P. ;
CORP Author Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. National Exposure Research Lab.
Publisher 1998
Year Published 1998
Report Number EPA/600/A-98/048;
Stock Number PB98-135619
Additional Subjects Lawn mowers ; Emission factors ; Exhaust composition ; Air pollution sampling ; Carbon monoxide ; Nitrogen oxides ; Hydrocarbons ; Benzene ; Formaldehyde ; Acetaldehyde ; Butadiene ; Ozone ; Exhaust emission tests ; Engine dynamometers ; Air pollution monitoring ; Duty cycle ; Emission rates
Internet Access
Description Access URL
https://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=P100S0XR.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
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Status
NTIS  PB98-135619 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 08/30/1998
Collation 20p
Abstract
The paper presents emissions data obtained from seven lawn mower engines that were tested using three duty cycles: a six mode steady-state test, a quasi-steady-state test, and a transient test. A comparison of emissions from the three duty cycles is made for non-methane organic gases, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, detailed hydrocarbons (percent of total organic emissions that are paraffin, olefin, aromatic, or acetylene), and toxic compounds (benzene, 1,3-butadiene, formaldehyde, and acetaldehyde). Dufferences in ozone potential are also determined and reported for each duty cycle. The study includes both regulated and unregulated (not certified to any emission standard) test engines that have a wide range of emission rates. Results indicate that regulated emission rate differences due to duty cycle are fairly small (less than ten percent on the average). For over half of the regulated emission data, there is no significant difference in emission rates between data obtained using the steady-state and transient duty cycle. Emission comparisons are even better between the quasi-steady-state and steady-state data.