Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 45 OF 92

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Legionella pneumophila Pathogenesis and Immunity / [electronic resource] :
Type EBOOK
Author Hoffman, Paul.
Other Authors
Author Title of a Work
Friedman, Herman.
Bendinelli, Mauro.
Publisher Springer US,
Year Published 2008
Call Number QR1-502
ISBN 9780387708966
Subjects Life sciences. ; Immunology. ; Emerging infectious diseases. ; Microbiology.
Internet Access
Description Access URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-70896-6
Collation XVIII, 208 p. online resource.
Notes
Due to license restrictions, this resource is available to EPA employees and authorized contractors only
Contents Notes
Legionella pneumophila Pathogenesis: Lessons Learned from Genomics -- Iron Assimilation and Type II Protein Secretion -- The Dot/Icm Type IVB Secretion System -- Life Cycle, Growth Cycles and Developmental Cycle of Legionella pneumophila -- Legionella in the Environment -- Regulation of the Legionella pneumophila Life Cycle -- Microbial Physiology -- Legionnaires' Disease-Clinical Picture -- Legionella pneumophila:Innate and Adaptive Immunity -- Nonspecific Stimulation of Immunity Against Legionella -- Interaction of Legionella pneumophila with Amoeba. Legionella pneumophila is an emerging human pathogen that resides in natural environments as a parasite of freshwater. There have been new developments in this field including the publication of three whole genome sequences, the discovery of a developmental cycle and novel cyst-like highly infectious form, and the bacteria have been used as a probe for macrophage cellular function to unravel fundamental new knowledge in the area of cellular biology. Legionella has also become a model system for the study of innate as well as adaptive immunity. Information on Legionella continues to increase in the U.S. and abroad. Columbia University has started the first Legionella Genome Project with a multi-million dollar grant from the NIH. In addition, The European Working Group for Legionella infections was formed in 1986. Members are scientists with an interest in improving knowledge and information on the clinical and environmental aspects of legionnaires' disease through developments in diagnosis, management and treatment of the disease. The volume brings together all of the lastest research on this pathogen, the interest in which is rapidly growing.