Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 13 OF 14

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Surface Chemical Effects on Colloid Stability and Transport through Natural Porous Media.
Author Puls, R. W. ; Paul, C. J. ; Clark, D. A. ;
CORP Author ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc., Ada, OK.;Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Lab., Ada, OK.
Publisher c1993
Year Published 1993
Report Number EPA/600/J-93/351;
Stock Number PB93-228575
Additional Subjects Porous media ; Surface chemistry ; Colloids ; Environmental transport ; Land pollution ; Aquifer systems ; Subsurface investigations ; Particle size ; Water pollution ; Ground water ; Electrodynamics ; Scanning electron microscopy ; Surfactants ; Adsorption ; Iron phosphates ; Electrophoresis ; Aqueons solutions ; Experimental design ; Reprints ;
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
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Status
NTIS  PB93-228575 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 11/22/1993
Collation 16p
Abstract
Surface chemical effects on colloidal stability and transport through porous media were investigated using laboratory column techniques. Approximately 100nm diameter, spherical, iron oxide particles were synthesized as the mobile colloidal phase. The column packing material was retrieved from sand and gravel aquifer on Cape Cod, MA. Previous studies have indicated enhanced stability and transport of iron oxide particles due to specific adsorption of some inorganic anions on the iron oxide surface. This phenomenon was further evaluated with an anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate. Surfactants constitute a significant mass of the contaminant loading at the Cape Cod site and their presence may contribute to colloidal transport as a significant transport mechanism at the site. Photon correlation spectroscopy, micro-electrophoretic mobility, and scanning electron microscopy were used to evaluate particle stability, mobility, and size. Adsorption of negatively charged organic and inorganic species onto the surface of the iron oxide particles was shown to significantly enhance particle stability and transport through alterations of the electrokinetic properties of the particle surface. Particle breakthrough was primarily dependent upon colloidal stability and surface charge.