Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 150 OF 265

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Modeling and Measurement of Real-Time CO Concentrations in Roadway Microenvironments.
Author Singh, R. B. ; Huber, A. H. ; Braddock, J. N. ;
CORP Author Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. National Exposure Research Lab.
Publisher 2000
Year Published 2000
Report Number EPA/600/A-00/013;
Stock Number PB2000-105754
Additional Subjects Carbon monoxide ; Ecological concentration ; Air pollution monitoring ; Mathematical models ; Exhaust emissions ; Emission factors ; Air pollution dispersion ; Diffusion modeling ; Atmospheric diffusion ; Mobile pollutant sources ; Parked vehicles ; Environmental exposure pathway ; Public health ; Moving vehicles
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
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Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB2000-105754 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. 08/25/2000
Collation 22p
Abstract
The United States Environmental Protection Agency's National Exposure Research Laboratory has initiated a project to improve the methodology for modeling motor vehicle emissions from source through the pathway to human exposure. A real-time microscale automobile emission factor model for CO (MicroFacCO) virtually capturing all the information in the real world had been developed for United States vehicles. The goal is to use this CO model as a surrogate for other tailpipe air toxic emissions. The emission model is being used in conjunction with roadway dispersion models (e.g., CALINE4), and being evaluated in the roadways around Research Triangle Park, North Carolina in a range of traffic fleet and meteorological conditions. Modeled concentrations are being compared with measured concentrations inside a moving vehicle and parked vehicle along the roadside. This paper discusses the new emission model, demonstrates the use of the emission model in modeling roadway air concentrations through an example, and discusses the issues and research needs for improving the methodology of modeling human exposures to mobile source emissions.