Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 381 OF 1357

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Hydrogeology of Solid Waste Disposal Sites in Madison, Wisconsin.
Author Kaufman, Robert F. ; Stephenso, David A. ;
CORP Author Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Water Resources Center.
Year Published 1970
Report Number OWRR-A-018-WIS; 02825,; A-018-WIS(1)
Stock Number PB-196 360
Additional Subjects ( Hydrogeology ; Earth fills) ; ( Refuse disposal ; Water pollution) ; ( Wisconsin ; Earthfills) ; Ground water recharge ; Solids ; Nitrogen organic compounds ; Nitrogen inorganic compounds ; Dissolved gases ; Oxygen ; Phosphorous organic compounds ; Sites ; Drainage ; Urbanization ; Nutrients ; Madison(Wisconsin) ; Lake Monona ; Solid waste disposal ; Sanitary landfills
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB-196 360 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 06/23/1988
Collation 422p
Abstract
Two existing, and 24 prospective, sanitary landfill sites in Madison, Wisconsin were examined. Former ground-water discharge characteristics of the existing sites have been altered as a result of the placement of fill and ground-water pumpage. Surface- and ground-water resources adjacent to landfill areas were found to receive pollutants although adverse effects were limited. Less than 5 per cent of the total organic and inorganic nitrogen and total soluble phosphorus entering Lake Monona was attributable to the landfill operation. Ground-water recharge was between 35 to 50 per cent of annual precipitation with lateral discharge to adjacent ground- and surface-water resources. The increase in dissolved chemical species was high, but restricted to local areas. Over the past 27 years, background quality in the two creeks receiving drainage changed by a 10-22 fold decrease in organic nitrogen and a 2-2.9 fold decrease in inorganic nitrogen. Phosphorus levels increased 2-6 fold. Decreased base flow and urbanization have possibly influenced these changes. (Author)