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RECORD NUMBER: 13 OF 37

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Effect of load simulation on auto emissions and model performance /
Author Gabele, Peter A. ; Snow, R.
Other Authors
Author Title of a Work
Snow, Richard
CORP Author Environmental Sciences Research Lab., Research Triangle Park, NC. Emissions Measurement and Characterization Div.
Publisher U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, Environmental Sciences Research Laboratory,
Year Published 1983
Report Number PB84-120369; EPA-600/3-83-104
Stock Number PB84-120369
OCLC Number 759495502
Subjects Automobiles--Motors--Exhaust gas. ; Modal analysis. ; Dynamometer.
Additional Subjects Air pollution ; Exhaust emissions ; Mathematical models ; Loads(Forces) ; Error analysis ; Urban areas ; Carbon monoxide ; Hydrocarbons ; Nitrogen oxides ; Concentration(Composition) ; Sources ; Automobile exhaust ; Modal model
Internet Access
Description Access URL
http://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=9100Y4A2.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
ELCD  EPA 600-3-83-104 NVFEL Library/Ann Arbor, MI 11/07/2011
NTIS  PB84-120369 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 06/23/1988
Collation viii, 20 p. : ill., charts ; 28 cm.
Abstract
The overall objective of this study was to identify sources which might contribute to errors in mobile source emission rate model predictions. The effect of road load simulation on exhaust emissions was examined and an evaluation of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Automobile Exhaust Emission Modal Model was conducted. The Modal Model is a component of the Intersection Midblock Model and MOBILE2, two widely used programs for predicting emissions from mobile sources. Results from tests on a Chevrolet Celebrity (3000 pounds gross vehicle weight) indicated that emissions during tests with water brake load simulation did not differ significantly from those during tests with actual road load simulation. Evaluation of the Modal Model was completed by comparing actual emissions data with predicted values. The Celebrity was used to generate emissions data for the New York City Cycle, the Surveillance Driving Schedule, and the Federal Test Procedure. Results indicated that the Modal Model was unable to accurately predict emission rates for the Celebrity.
Notes
Includes bibliographical references. "PB84-120369." "November 1983." "EPA-600/3-83-104."
Contents Notes
The overall objective of this study was to identify sources which might contribute to errors in mobile source emissions rate model predications. The effect of road load simulation on exhaust emissions was examined and an evaluation of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Automobile Exhaust Emission Modal Model was conducted. The Modal Model is a component of the Intersection Midblock Model and MOBILE2, two widely used programs for predicting emissions from mobile sources. Results from tests on a Chevrolet Celebrity (3000 pounds gross vehicle weight) indicated that emissions during tests with water brake load simulation did not differ significantly from those during tests with actual road load simulation. For the Celebrity, the load applied by the water brake with the tire rolling resistance losses on the dynamometer was approximately equal to the actual road load measured in highway tests. Evaluation of the Modal Model was completed by comparing actual emissions data with predicted values. The Celebrity was used to generate emissions data for the New York City Cycle, the Surveillance Driving Schedule, and the Federal Test Procedure. Results indicated that the Modal Model was unable to accurately predict emission rates for the Celebrity.