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OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title A retrospective view of the value of short-term genetic bioassays in predicting the chronic effects of diesel soot /
Author Lewtas, Joellen. ; Williams, K.
Other Authors
Author Title of a Work
Williams, Katherine.
CORP Author Health Effects Research Lab., Research Triangle Park, NC.
Publisher U.S. Environment Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, Health Effects Research Laboratory,
Year Published 1986
Report Number PB86-240934; EPA/600/D-86/189
Stock Number PB86-240934
OCLC Number 759935308
Subjects Health risk assessment. ; Air--Pollution--Toxicology. ; Mutagenicity testing. ; Genetic toxicology--Technique.
Additional Subjects Toxicology ; Soot ; Air pollution ; bioassay ; Aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons ; Carcinogens ; Exposure ; Exhaust emissions ; Mutagen ; Combustion products ; Diesel engine exhaust ; Inhalation ; Chromosomal aberrations
Internet Access
Description Access URL
http://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=9100Y6NW.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
ELCD  EPA 600-D-86-189 NVFEL Library/Ann Arbor, MI 11/14/2011
NTIS  PB86-240934 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 06/21/1988
Collation ii, 22 p. : charts ; 28 cm.
Abstract
In retrospect, it is now safe to conclude that short-term mutagenicity assays were not only useful but instrumental in: (1) indicating that diesel soot was potentially carcinogenic and should be evaluated in chronic animal cancer bioassays, (2) identifying NO2-PAHs as potential carcinogens in this very complex mixture, (3) providing initial evidence that the mutagens were bioavailable, and (4) estimating the relative importance of various sources and fuels and other factors which can influence human exposure to carcinogens. This is not to say that short-term bioassays used alone can accomplish all of this. However, used in combination with chemical/analytical methods and toxicological tools, short-term genetic bioassays have become a critical component of many environmental health studies. Although substantial advances in our knowledge of the toxicology of diesel emissions have been made since 1978 when the initial observation that the organics extracted from diesel soot were mutagenic, a number of important questions remain not only for diesel emissions but for other combustion sources as well.
Notes
Includes bibliographical references (p. 19-22). EPA/600/D-86/189." "August 1986." "PB86-240934."
Contents Notes
In retrospect, it is now safe to conclude that short-term mutagenicity assays were not only useful but instrumental in: (1) indicating that diesel soot was potentially carcinogenic and should be evaluated in chronic animal cancer bioassays, (2) identifying NOb2s-PAHs as potential carcinogens in this very complex mixture, (3) providing initial evidence that the mutagens were bioavailable, and (4) estimating the relative importance of various sources and fuels and other factors which can influence human exposure to carcinogens. This is not to say that short-term bioassays used alone can accomplish all of this. However, used in combination with chemical/analytical methods and toxicological tools, short-term genetic bioassays have become a critical component of many environmental health studies. Although substantial advances in our knowledge of the toxicology of diesel emissions have been made since 1978 when the initial observation that the organics extracted from diesel soot were mutagenic, a number of important questions remain not only for diesel emissions but for other combustion sources as well. Are the chemicals which induce positive results in the short-term bioassays the same agents which cause tumors in chronic animal bioassays? Which phase of the diesel emissions (gaseous or particulate) is carcinogenic in the animal inhalation studies? With advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in producing chronic effects such as cancer, it is possible that new genetic tools and short-term bioassays will continue to contribute to our ability to answer these and other questions as they arise.