Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 40 OF 71

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Interim Reregistration Eligibility Decision (IRED): Diazinon (Includes IRED Fact Sheet: Diazinon).
CORP Author Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances.
Publisher May 2004
Year Published 2004
Report Number EPA/738/R-04/006;
Stock Number PB2004-105829
Additional Subjects Diazinon ; Reregistration ; Organophosphates ; Pesticides ; Risk assessment ; Health effects ; Environmental pollutants ; Environmental exposure pathway ; Pest control ; Human tolerances ; Mitigation ; Regulations ; Drinking water ; Ecology ; Requirements ; Eligibility ; Public health ; Toxicity ; Interim Reregistration Eligibility Decisions(IRED)
Internet Access
Description Access URL
http://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=100046YE.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB2004-105829 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 10/29/2004
Collation 164p
Abstract
EPA has assessed the risks of diazinon and reached an Interim Reregistration Eligibility Decision (IRED) for this organophosphate (OP) pesticide. Without mitigation, diazinon poses unacceptable risks to agricultural workers and to birds and other wildlife species. To increase protection for workers, birds, and the environment, the Agency's decision includes provisions to phase out and cancel certain agricultural crop uses, the granular formulation, and aerial applications; reduce the amount and frequency of use; and employ engineering controls and other protective measurements. These changes in diazinon use were developed through discussions with the technical registrants and were based on extensive stakeholder input. Diazinon has been one of the most widely used insecticides in the U.S. for household as well as agricultural pest control. A December 2000 agreement with the technical registrants phased out and cancelled all indoor and outdoor residential uses in order to reduce risks to children and others.