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OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Development of a high volume surface sampler for pesticides in floor dust /
Author Roberts, J. W. ; Ruby, M. G.
Other Authors
Author Title of a Work
Ruby, M. G.
CORP Author Engineering Plus, Seattle, WA. ;Environmental Monitoring and Services, Inc., Camarillo, CA.;Environmental Monitoring Systems Lab., Research Triangle Park, NC.
Publisher U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory, U.S. Department of Commerce, National Technical Information Service
Year Published 1988
Report Number PB89-124630; EPA 600/4-88/036; EPA-68-02-4406
Stock Number PB89-124630
OCLC Number 878681794
Subjects Dust--Sampling--Equipment and supplies. ; Air sampling apparatus.
Additional Subjects Dust collectors ; Pesticides ; Sampling ; Chemical analysis ; Performance evaluation ; Design criteria ; Houses ; Indoor air pollution ; High volume samplers ; Volatile organic compounds(VOC)
Internet Access
Description Access URL
http://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=9101VYTD.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
EJBD ARCHIVE EPA 600-4-88-036 Headquarters Library/Washington,DC 05/06/2014
NTIS  PB89-124630 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 03/14/1989
Collation vii, 42 pages : ill., charts ; 28 cm.
Abstract
A high volume surface sampler (HVS2) for the collection of house dust and the semivolatile organics (including pesticides) in house dust has been designed and tested. The sampler consists of an intake nozzle, cyclone, and filter. The position of the nozzle is regulated by the static pressure in the nozzle. The HVS2 operates at approximately 9.5 L/s (20 cfm) and can collect more than 2 g of floor dust from a rug in an average clean residence in less than 4 min. Over 95% of the sample is retained in the cyclone. Both house dust and a test dust were spiked with 10 or 20 ppm chlorpyrifos and dieldrin and 50 or 100 ppm diazinon. Virtually all the pesticide was retained in the cylcone or on the filter. Conventional vacuum cleaners, small hand-held vacuum cleaners, gloves, semi-sticky paper, and carpet squares were not satisfactory substitutes. A recommended sampling procedure for the use of the HVS2, based on the test experiences reported here, is provided.
Contents Notes
House dust and the pollutants carried with house dust are potentially important contributors to exposure through the pathways of inhalation, ingestion and skin penetration, especially for small children. Pesticidesmay be one of the more important contaminants of house dust. A high volume surface sampler (HVS2) for the collection of house dust and the semivolatile organics in house dust has been designed and tested. The sampler consists of an intake nozzle, cyclone, and filter. The position of the nozzle is regulated by the static pressure in the nozzle. The HVS2 operates at approximately 9.5 L/s (20 cfm) and can collect more than 2 g of floor dust from a rug in an average clean residence in less than 4 min. Over 95% of the sample is retained in the cyclone and would thus be usable as a bulk sample for bioassays. The HSV2 collects approximately 30% of the dust less than 150 um from level loop and plush carpets. It collects 93.4% of the total dust from a smooth bare floor. The variation in the collection efficiency of fine dust in repeat trials on carpets was 8% for level loop carpets and 12% for plush carpets. The variation as the surface loading was changed of the same order. Previous studies of ambient sampling for pesticides suggested that semivolatile organics in house dust would not be retained on the filter and a polyurethane foam (PUF) absorbent filter would be necessary to collect them. Both house dust and a test dust were spiked with 10 or 20 ppm chlorpyrifos anddieldrin and 50 or 100 ppm diazion. Virtually all the pesticide was retained in the cyclone or on the filter. Although a PUF filter does not appear to be necessary, it can be used with the HVS2. Several alternative sampling methods were also studied. The collection efficiency for fine dust of conventional upright and conister-type vacuum cleaners, as well as small hand-held vaccuum cleaners, was not sufficient and use as required here would have been difficult or impossible. Gloves, semi-sticky paper, and carpet squares were also found not to be satisfacoty. A recommended sampling procedure of the use of the HVS2, based on the test experiences reported here, is provided.