Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 428 OF 1433

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Economic Analysis of Effluent Guidelines Fertilizer Industry.
Author David, Milton L. ; Malk, J. M. ; Jones., C. Clyde ;
CORP Author Development Planning and Research Associates, Inc., Manhattan, Kans.;Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C. Office of Planning and Evaluation.
Year Published 1974
Report Number 121; EPA-68-01-1533; EPA/230/2-74-010;
Stock Number PB-241 315
Additional Subjects Water pollution economics ; Economic impacts ; Water pollution standards ; Cost estimates ; Water pollution standards ; Cost estimates ; Water pollution abatement ; Financing ; Prices ; Technology ; Competition ; Profits ; Employment ; Communities ; Shutdowns ; Industrial plants ; Nitrogen inorganic compounds ; Phosphorus inorganic compounds ; Fertilizer industry ; Industrial shutdowns ; SIC 2873 ; SIC 2874
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB-241 315 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 06/23/1988
Collation 213p
Abstract
This report on the basic fertilizer chemicals segment of the fertilizer manufacturing industry analyzes the economic impacts of water pollution controls. Under the provisions of Sections 304 and 306 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, EPA has proposed effluent guidelines for basic fertilizer chemicals plants. The purpose of this study is the evaluation of potential economic impacts resulting from the implementation of the effluent guidelines. The evaluation approach used is generally one of describing and analyzing the industry in terms of structure; number and types of firms and plants; location, age and technology of plants; financial data for model or representative plants; and pricing practices and supply-demand relationships. Then, pollution control costs are super-imposed on the model plant profiles to determine micro-economic effects, such as price increases expected and potential closures. Macro impacts on the industry are then analyzed for effects on employment, communities, balance of payments and related matters.