Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 49 OF 99

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Oil Spill Research and Development Needs for the 1990's.
Author Farlow, J. S. ; Cunningham, J. M. ;
CORP Author Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk Reduction Engineering Lab.
Publisher Jan 89
Year Published 1989
Report Number EPA/600/D-88/278;
Stock Number PB89-142665
Additional Subjects Water pollution control ; Oceans ; Surface waters ; Control equipment ; Booms(Equipment) ; Sorbents ; Cleaning ; Skimmers ; Dispersing ; Rivers ; Inlets(Waterways) ; Research projects ; Oil spills ; Oil pollution removal ; Contingency planning ; Remedial actions
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB89-142665 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 06/08/1989
Collation 18p
Abstract
In the 1970s and the early 1980s the emphasis of Federally-sponsored oil spill research was on mechanical spill control devices and removal methods such as booms, skimmers, and sorbents, with later efforts also focused on dispersing agents. The preponderance of the work was directed toward oil spills in open ocean and coastal areas. Private research programs and field experience also contributed to the extensive knowledge-base capabilities and limitations of mechanical and chemical oil spill control and cleanup methods. In fiscal 1988, research and development in prevention and cleanup of oil spills was suspended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in favor of other high priority topics. However, recent events have shown that further research is needed on preventing and cleanup methods, especially for inland spills. Furthermore, innovations developed since the early 1980s have yet to be evaluated in a controlled setting, even in the open sea. The paper presents topics for an oil spill research and development agenda through the beginning of the 1990s that will help to fill those voids in the areas of spill prevention and response.