Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 3 OF 96

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title A framework for ecosystem management in the interior Columbia Basin and portions of the Klamath and Great Basins /
Other Authors
Author Title of a Work
Haynes, Richard W.
Graham, Russell T.
Quigley, Thomas Milton.
Publisher U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station,
Year Published 1996
OCLC Number 36417554
Subjects Ecosystem management--Columbia River Watershed. ; Ecosystem management--Klamath River Watershed (Or. and Calif.) ; Ecosystem management--Great Basin. ; United States--Columbia River Watershed. ; United States--Great Basin. ; United States--Klamath River Watershed.
Internet Access
Description Access URL
http://www.fs.fed.us/pnw/pubs/gtr_374.pdf
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
ESAM  QH76.5.C63F72 1996 Region 10 Library/Seattle,WA 01/16/1998
Collation iv, 68 pages : illustrations, map ; 28 cm.
Notes
Includes bibliographical references (pages 39-44).
Contents Notes
"A framework for ecosystem management is proposed. This framework assumes the purpose of ecosystem management is to maintain the integrity of ecosystems over time and space. It is based on four ecosystem principles: ecosystems are dynamic, can be viewed as hierarchies with temporal and spatial dimensions, have limits, and are relatively unpredictable. This approach recognizes that people are part of ecosystems and that stewardship must be able to resolve tough challenges including how to meet multiple demands with finite resources. The framework describes a general planning model for ecosystem management that has four iterative steps: monitoring, assessment, decision-making, and implementation. Since ecosystems cross jurisdictional lines, the implementation of the framework depends on partnerships among land managers, the scientific community, and stakeholders. It proposes that decision-making be based on information provided by the beset available science and the most appropriate technologies for land management"--Page ii.