Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 62 OF 329

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Climate Change in the United States: Benefits of Global Action.
CORP Author Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Year Published 2015
Report Number EPA/430/R-15/001
Stock Number PB2015-105366
Additional Subjects Climate change ; Environmental impacts ; United States ; Climatic changes ; Human health ; Environmental health ; Greenhouse gases ; Greenhouse effects ; Greenhouse gas emissions ; Economic effects ; Environmental damage ; Global aspects ; Water resources ; Climate Change Impacts and Risk Analysis (CIRA) project
Internet Access
Description Access URL
https://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=P100MHQI.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB2015-105366 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 02/03/2016
Collation 96p
Abstract
This report summarizes and communicates the results of EPA’s ongoing Climate Change Impacts and Risk Analysis (CIRA) project. The goal of this work is to estimate to what degree climate change impacts and damages to multiple U.S. sectors (e.g., human health, infrastructure, and water resources) may be avoided or reduced in a future with significant global action to reduce GHG emissions, compared to a future in which current emissions continue to grow. Importantly, only a small portion of the impacts of climate change are estimated, and therefore this report captures just some of the total benefits of reducing GHGs. To achieve this, a multi-model framework was developed to estimate the impacts and damages to the human health and welfare of people in the U.S. The CIRA framework uses consistent inputs (e.g., socioeconomic and climate scenarios) to enable consistent comparison of sectoral impacts across time and space. In addition, the role of adaptation is modeled for some of the sectors to explore the potential for risk reduction and, where applicable, to quantify the costs associated with adaptive actions.