Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 266 OF 329

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Report of the Interagency Task Force on Carbon Capture and Storage.
CORP Author Department of Energy, Washington, DC.; Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Year Published 2010
Stock Number PB2010-115033
Additional Subjects Carbon dioxide ; Climate change ; Emission reduction ; Air pollution control ; Federal government agencies ; Fossil-fuel power plants ; Greenhouse gases ; Electric power ; Cost effectiveness ; Deployment ; Demonstration projects ; Regulations ; Carbon capture and storage (CCS)
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB2010-115033 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 01/21/2011
Collation 233p
Abstract
Carbon capture and storage (CCS) refers to a set of technologies that can greatly reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from new and existing coal- and gas-fired power plants, industrial processes, and other stationary sources of CO2. In its application to electricity generation, CCS could play an important role in achieving national and global greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction goals. However, widespread cost-effective deployment of CCS will occur only if the technology is commercially available and a supportive national policy framework is in place. In keeping with that objective, on February 3, 2010, President Obama established an Interagency Task Force on Carbon Capture and Storage composed of 14 Executive Departments and Federal Agencies. The Task Force, co-chaired by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), was charged with proposing a plan to overcome the barriers to the widespread, cost-effective deployment of CCS within ten years, with a goal of bringing five to ten commercial demonstration projects online by 2016. Composed of more than 100 Federal employees, the Task Force examined challenges facing early CCS projects as well as factors that could inhibit widespread commercial deployment of CCS.