Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 34 OF 45

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Recent Variations in Course and Regimen, Kansas River and Nearby Reaches of Missouri River.
Author Dort, Jr, Wakefield ; Ratzlaf, John R. ;
CORP Author Kansas Water Resources Research Inst., Manhattan.
Year Published 1970
Report Number Contrib-50; OWRR-A-025-KAN; A-025-KAN(1),; 04542
Stock Number PB-197 593
Additional Subjects ( Channels(Waterways) ; Sediment transport) ; ( Waterways(Watercourses) ; Stream erosion) ; Stream flow ; Runoff ; Sedimentation ; Rainfall intensity ; Seasonal variations ; Regression analysis ; Kansas ; Kansas River ; Missouri River
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
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Status
NTIS  PB-197 593 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. 06/23/1988
Collation 78p
Abstract
Changes in stream morphology can be deterministic (alterations of variables within the physical system by climatic or cultural influences and effects) or probabilistic (random processes). It may be difficult or impossible to isolate and identify specific cause and effect relationships. Evaluation of changes in channel pattern and sinuosity of the Kansas River involves the selection of data of appropriate quantity and quality. Data for channel pattern and stream discharge, which constitute an empirically-derived functional relationship, best meet the requirements. Stream discharge, through its association with precipitation, is investigated on a time scale of several decades. Annual discharge before these measurements were recorded is estimated indirectly from annual precipitation computed as a representative figure for the entire drainage basin. Settlement and cultivation accelerated erosion and resulted in increased sediment loads supplied to the river. The significance of this change is discussed along with other possible factors. The channel lengths and gradients upstream and downstream from the study area are studied. An interpretation of the configuration and behavior of the river prior to 1850 is presented. (WRSIC abstract)