Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 30 OF 94

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Estimation of Free Hydrocarbon Volume from Fluid Levels in Monitoring Wells.
Author Lenhard, R. J. ; Parker., J. C. ;
CORP Author Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg. Center for Environmental and Hazardous Material Studies.;Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Lab., Ada, OK.
Publisher c1990
Year Published 1990
Report Number EPA/600/J-90/538;
Stock Number PB91-233387
Additional Subjects Hydrocarbons ; Observation wells ; Ground water ; Water pollution sampling ; Oil spills ; Underground storage ; Storage tanks ; Vertical motion ; Particle size distribution ; Density(Mass/volume) ; Aquifers ; Saturation ; Remedial action ; Fluid boundaries ; Land pollution ; Environmental transport ; Fluid pressures ; Reprints ; Light NonAqueous Phase Liquid
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB91-233387 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 11/26/1991
Collation 13p
Abstract
Under the assumption of local vertical equilibrium, fluid pressure distributions specified from well fluid levels in monitoring wells may be used to predict water and hydrocarbon saturation profiles given expressions for air-water-hydrocarbon saturation-pressure relations. Vertical integration of the oil-saturation profile yields the actual oil volume in porous media per unit area adjacent to the well. Three-phase fluid distributions are predicted using a scaling procedure which requires knowledge of two-phase air-water saturation-pressure relations, hydrocarbon density, and hydrocarbon surface tension. Results reveal that whereas the distance above an oil-water table at which oil saturations become zero may be independent of soil type, estimated light nonaqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) volumes per unit area may differ substantially. Hence, estimates of LNAPL volume cannot be inferred directly from soil LNAPL thickness or well LNAPL thickness data without consideration of effects of soil properties. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that no simple linear conversion scheme can be employed to relate the height of LNAPL in a monitoring well to the LNAPL volume in porous media. Effects of grain-size distribution and well LNAPL thickness on the ration of actual LNAPL thickness in the aquifer to well LNAPL thickness are shown.