Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 18 OF 22

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Statistical Issues in Epidemiologic Studies of the Health Effects of Ambient Acid Aerosols.
Author Ware, J. H. ; Stram., D. O. ;
CORP Author Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA.;Health Effects Research Lab., Research Triangle Park, NC.
Publisher c1988
Year Published 1988
Report Number EPA-R-813495; EPA/600/J-88/525;
Stock Number PB90-232331
Additional Subjects Public health ; Aerosols ; Epidemiology ; Statistical analysis ; Biostatistics ; Reprints ; Air pollution effects(Humans) ; Acid smut ; Ecological concentrations
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB90-232331 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. 08/27/1990
Collation 11p
Abstract
Although the ecologic effects of acid rain have been widely reported, relatively little is known about the effects of acidic air pollution on human health. Some epidemiologic and animal studies suggest, however, that acidity is an important determinant of the respiratory health effects of aerosols. The paper reviews some of that evidence and discusses its implications for the design and analysis of epidemiologic studies. Two types of exposure patterns are contrasted: peak exposures associated with air pollution episodes, and chronic exposures resulting from persistently high levels of air pollutants. Recent work on the analysis of repeated categorical outcome variables provides new methods for the analysis of episode studies. Studies of long-term exposure require comparisons among population groups, and these comparisons can be subject to the design effects characteristic of multistage sample surveys. The paper examines the implications of these design effects for epidemiologic studies. The paper also discusses the measurement errors induced by the use of outdoor measurements to quantify personal exposure, and ways to assess effects of such errors on conventional analyses of air pollution studies.