Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 23 OF 227

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Benthic Macroinvertebrate Communities at Maryland's Core/Trend Monitoring Stations: Water Quality Status and Trends.
Author E. S. Friedman
CORP Author Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources, Annapolis. Monitoring and Non-Tidal Assessment Div.; Environmental Protection Agency, Annapolis, MD. Chesapeake Bay Program.
Year Published 2009
Report Number CBWP-MANTA-MN-09-1
Stock Number PB2014-108943
Additional Subjects Benthos ; Invertebrates ; Biological communities ; Water quality ; Maryland ; Biological indicators ; Clean Water Act ; Historical data ; Land use ; Rivers ; State programs ; Trends ; Water pollution monitoring ; Water sampling ; Water use ; Monitoring stations
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB2014-108943 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 02/25/2015
Collation 95p
Abstract
A benthic macroinvertebrate monitoring program known as the TREND program was created in the early 1970's and was based on the Baseline monitoring program established by the Interstate Commission Potomac River Basin (ICPRB) for the Potomac River. The program monitored the aquatic environment by sampling the community of macroinvertebrates at selected sites across Maryland. In response to the 1972 Federal Clean Water Act additional benthic macroinvertebrate sites (CORE) were added to the program and the CORE/TREND monitoring program was established in the early to mid 1970s. The overall plan and design of this program was to establish ambient water monitoring stations at fixed locations to document the status and determine long-term trends in water quality (QAQC 1995). These programs were intended to determine trends in water uses, impacts in problem areas, land use areas, and trends in areas where future development may influence water quality (U.S. EPA Report No. 440 1976). Stations were located, whenever possible, where historical data were available and within major rivers and larger tributaries of Maryland's drainage basins.