Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 11 OF 14

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Planetary Metabolism: Understanding the Carbon Cycle.
Author Moore, B. ; Braswell, B. H. ;
CORP Author New Hampshire Univ., Durham. Inst. for the Study of Earth, Oceans and Space.;Environmental Research Lab., Athens, GA. Office of Research and Development.
Publisher c1994
Year Published 1994
Report Number EPA-R-816278; EPA/600/J-94/458;
Stock Number PB95-131140
Additional Subjects Climatic changes ; Global ; Biochemical cycles ; Atmospheric composition ; Geochemistry ; Physical properties ; Mathematical models ; Carbon dioxide ; Heat balance ; Terrestrial radiation ; Greenhouse effect ; Land use ; Environmental effects ; Fossil fuels ; Biosphere ; Half life ; Reaction kinetics ; Estimates. Reprints ; Carbon cycle
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB95-131140 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. 03/06/1995
Collation 11p
Abstract
Biological systems are intimately involved in the transfers of energy and materials around our planet, affecting the geochemistry and other physical properties of the atmosphere, the land surface, and the oceans and their sediments. Fossil-fuel combustion, land use, and other human activities are, increasingly, disrupting these natural biogeochemical cycles and processes, with the potential for far-reaching consequences; for example, changes in atmospheric composition affecting the global heat balance. The carbon, nitrogen and sulfur cycles are of particular importance to the functioning of the biosphere, and are also closely linked to the physical climate system. Within IGBP, the global-scale modeling effort is initially focused on the carbon cycle: this is poorly understood--yet is critical to estimating future levels of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, and their direct and indirect interactions with the biosphere. To assist in determining the factors that influence the atmospheric lifetime of carbon dioxide, the concept of a single half-life is applied to three simple ocean carbon-cycle models and a model of global terrestrial carbon cycling.