Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 9 OF 11

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title NMDA Antagonist, MK-801, Suppresses Long-Term Potentiation, Kindling, and Kindling-Induced Potentiation in the Perforant Path of the Unanesthetized Rat.
CORP Author Northrop Services, Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC.;Health Effects Research Lab., Research Triangle Park, NC.
Publisher c1990
Year Published 1990
Report Number EPA/600/J-90/170;
Stock Number PB91-116087
Additional Subjects Pharmacology ; Evoked potentials ; Amygdala ; Synapses ; Reprints ; MD-801 ; Kindling(Neurology) ; N-methyl-d-aspartate ; Long-term potentiation ; Drug antagonism
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB91-116087 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 03/04/1991
Collation 10p
Abstract
Antagonism of NMDA-mediated transmission by MK-801 has been shown to block long-term potentiation (LTP) in vitro and delay electrical kindling of the amygdala. The experiment sought to examine the relationship between synaptic potentiation of the perforant path-granule cell synapse and development of perforant path kindling. MK-801 (0.1 and 1.0 mg/kg) blocked induction of LTP of the perforant path in the unanesthetized animal measured 24 h after train delivery. The 1.0 mg/kg dosage also increased afterdischarge (AD) thresholds, delayed kindling development from daily stimulation of the perforant path (x = 8.82 + or - and 22.9 + or - 3.66 sessions to the first stage 5 seizure), and increased AD durations. Kindling produced a significant potentiation of the EPSP (47%) and population spike (49%) after the first evoked AD in control animals. No significant enhancement of either component of the field potential was observed in MD-801-treated animals. Animals treated with this dosage of MD-801, did, however, kindle in the absence of potentiation at this synapse. It was concluded that although NMDA-mediated potentiation may facilitate kindling, synaptic potentiation does not appear to be a critical requirement for kindling to develop. (Copyright (c) 1990 Elsevier Science Publishers B.V.)