Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 44 OF 84

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Indoor aerosols and aerosol exposure /
Author Wiener, Russell W. ; Willeke, K. ; Baron, P. A.
Other Authors
Author Title of a Work
Rodes, Charles E.
CORP Author Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Atmospheric Research and Exposure Assessment Lab. ;North Carolina Univ. at Chapel Hill. Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering.
Publisher Van Nostrand Reinhold,
Year Published 1993
Report Number EPA/600/A-93/162;
Stock Number PB93-212827
OCLC Number 728024502
Subjects Aerosols--Measurement. ; Air--Pollution--Measurement.
Additional Subjects Indoor air pollution ; Air pollution sampling ; Aerosol monitoring ; Impactors ; Photometers ; Air samplers ; Chemical analysis ; Aerosols ; Air quality ; Exposure ; Risk assessment ; Public health ; Reprints ; Personal sampling ; Microenvironmental sampling
Internet Access
Description Access URL
https://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=9100RRIX.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
ESAD  EPA 600-A-93-162 Region 10 Library/Seattle,WA 06/07/2011
NTIS  PB93-212827 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. 11/22/1993
Collation p. 659-689 : ill., charts ; 28 cm.
Abstract
The study of aerosols in indoor air and the assessment of human exposure to aerosols are relatively recent activities. The terms indoor air and exposure assessment refer primarily to nonindustrial settings, such as homes, offices, and public-access buildings (e.g., museums, airport terminals, retail stores). Although many occupational settings are 'indoors', the aerosol concentrations and constituents, airflow regimes, and turbulence levels pose related, but different, aerosol measurement constraints. Until recently, it was commonly believed that the quality of indoor air was superior to that of the outdoor (ambient) air nearby. Several factors have influenced the apparent deterioration of indoor air quality: life-styles have changed; building construction techniques have changed; and people have become more concerned about environmental tobacco smoke (ETS).
Notes
Caption title. Chapter from "Aerosol Measurement: Principles, Techniques, and Applications" edited by Klaus Willeke and Paul A. Baron. Includes bibliographical references (p.683-689).