Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 13 OF 18

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Meteorological Events That Produced the Highest Ground-Level Concentrations during Complex Terrain Field Experiments.
Author Schiermeier, F. A. ; Lavery, T. F. ; DiCristofaro, D. C. ;
CORP Author Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Atmospheric Sciences Research Lab. ;Environmental Research and Technology, Inc., Concord, MA.
Year Published 1985
Report Number EPA/600/D-85/114;
Stock Number PB85-210854
Additional Subjects Air pollution ; Models ; Concentration(Composition) ; Mountainous ; Meteorology ; Models ; Terrain models
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
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Status
NTIS  PB85-210854 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 06/21/1988
Collation 14p
Abstract
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is sponsoring the Complex Terrain Model Development project, a multi-year study to develop improved models for calculating ground-level air pollutant concentrations that result from large emission sources located in mountainous terrain. The project started with tracer and flow visualization experiments and fluid modeling for isolated, simple terrain features--Cinder Cone Butte (CCB), Idaho and the Hogback Ridge (HBR), New Mexico--and has progressed to the Full Scale Plume Study (FSPS), conducted at the Tracy Power Plant near Reno, Nevada during August 1984. The CCB and HBR experiments and related fluid modeling have demonstrated the usefulness of the concept of a dividing-streamline height (Hs) in discriminating between essentially horizontal flow that goes around the sides of the terrain features and flow that goes up and over the terrain. An analysis of tracer gas concentrations observed at CCB and HBR showed that the highest concentrations occurred during direct impingement of plumes released at elevations near the height of the dividing streamline.