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RECORD NUMBER: 5 OF 8

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Intact Soil-Core Microcosms for Evaluating the Fate and Ecological Impact of the Release of Genetically Engineered Microorganisms.
Author Bentjen, S. A. ; Fredrickson, J. K. ; Van Voris, P. ; Li, S. W. ;
CORP Author Idaho Univ., Moscow. Dept. of Bacteriology and Biochemistry. ;Battelle Pacific Northwest Labs., Richland, WA.;Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.;Department of Energy, Washington, DC.
Publisher c1989
Year Published 1989
Report Number EPA/600/J-89/105;
Stock Number PB90-108267
Additional Subjects Soil microbiology ; Core testing ; Seeding(Inoculation) ; Mutations ; Microorganisms ; Wheat ; Deoxyribonucleic acids ; Reprints ; Genetic engineering ; Azospirillum lipoferum Tn5 ; Microcosms ; Ecological monitoring ; Nucleic acid hybridization ; Agar gel electrophoresis ; Restriction mapping ; Maize
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
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Status
NTIS  PB90-108267 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. 03/10/1990
Collation 7p
Abstract
Intact soil-core microcosms were studied to determine their applicability for evaluating the transport, survival, and potential ecosystem effects of genetically engineered microorganisms before they are released into the environment. Soil-core microcosms were planted with wheat and maize seeds and inoculated with Azospirillum lipoferum SpBr17 and SpRG20a Tn5 mutants, respectively. Microcosm leachate, rhizosphere soil, plant endorhizosphere, insects, and xylem exudate were sampled for A. lipoferum Tn5 mutant populations. A. lipoferum Tn5 populations, determined by most-probable-number technique-DNA hybridization, varied from below detection to 10(6) g of dry root(-1) in the rhizosphere, with smaller populations detected in the endorhizosphere. Intact soil-core microcosms were found to maintain some of the complexities of the natural ecosystem and should be particularly for initial evaluations of the fate of plant-associated genetically engineered bacteria. (Copyright (c) 1989 American Society for Microbiology.)