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RECORD NUMBER: 27 OF 39

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Oxidation and Acidification of Anaerobic Sediment-Water Systems by Autoclaving.
Author Tratnyek, P. G. ; Wolfe, N. L. ;
CORP Author Environmental Research Lab., Athens, GA. ;Oregon Graduate Inst. of Science and Technology, Beaverton.
Publisher c1993
Year Published 1993
Report Number EPA/600/J-93/283;
Stock Number PB93-222743
Additional Subjects Sediment-water interfaces ; Oxidation reduction reactions ; Acidification ; Anaerobic processes ; Water pollution control ; Environmental effects ; Land pollution control ; Soil properties ; pH ; Organic matter ; Chemical properties ; Water chemistry ; Microorganisms ; Reprints ; Autoclaving
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
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Status
NTIS  PB93-222743 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 11/22/1993
Collation 6p
Abstract
An important aspect of studies on the fate of organic pollutants is identification of environmental agents that are responsible for observed degradation reactions. To this end, many studies using natural water, soil, or sediment as a medium rely heavily on autoclaved control experiments to distinguish abiotic from biotic processes. The effect of autoclaving on the acid/base and redox properties of anaerobic sediment slurries was determined to facilitate the interpretation of autoclaved controls in studies of environmental reduction reactions. Autoclaving decreased electrode measurements of pH by 0.26 to 0.68 units and increased electrode measurements of Eh by 34 to 94 mV. To corroborate this effect, the authors added redox indicators to the slurries and observed that autoclaving caused a shift in color consistent with the change in electrode measurements. Further investigation demonstrated that the observed effects are a common characteristic of autoclaving anaerobic sediment and are not limited to very restricted sediment types and are not artifacts of the way the experiments were performed.