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OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Guidelines for the application of analytical techniques for fine and course particulate matter samples
Author Willis, R. D. ; Blanchard, F. T. ; Conner, T. L. ;
Other Authors
Author Title of a Work
Willis Robert D.
Blanchard, Fredrick T.
Conner, Teri L.
CORP Author ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC.;Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. National Exposure Research Lab.
Year Published 2002
Report Number EPA/600/R-02/070; PB2004-100988
Stock Number PB2004-100988
OCLC Number 265222662
Subjects Particles--Environmental aspects. ; Air--Pollution--United States.
Additional Subjects Particulate matter ; Laboratory procedures ; Aerosols ; Size ; Chemistry ; Morphology ; Source apportionment ; Guidelines ; Analytical techniques ; Emission sources ; Statistical analysis ; Data sets ; Scanning electron microscopy ; Energy-dispersive x-ray analysis ; SEM/EDX
Internet Access
Description Access URL
https://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=P1005I40.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
ESAD  EPA 600-R-02-070 Region 10 Library/Seattle,WA 11/03/2008
NTIS  PB2004-100988 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 04/04/2019
Collation one CD-ROM containing 128 page document.
Abstract
Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) coupled with Energy-Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) is a powerful tool in the characterization and source apportionment of environmental particulate matter (PM), providing use, chemistry, and morphology of particles as small as a few tenths of a micron. Such information can reveal information about emission sources which cannot be determined through bulk chemical analysis. Automated SEMs capable of routinely analyzing hundreds of particles per hour have dramatically increased the throughput of SEM/EDX, making it feasible to conduct statistically meaningful analyses of PM samples and to generate large data sets for source apportionment studies. The National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) of the U.S. EPA has been developing and evaluating the use of SEM/EDX to characterize ambient and source-derived particles. The present document, which evolved over several years as a product of research carried out in support of the U.S. EPA/NERL SEM/EDX Laboratory, is intended to provide guidelines for researchers using SEM/EDX for aerosol characterization and source apportionment. Topics include laboratory procedures for sample handling, sample preparation, guidelines for successful manual and automated SEM/EDX analyses, data interpretation, issues relating to data quality and method validation, and case studies highlighting the use of SEM/EDX in PM research.
Notes
The information in this document has been funded wholly by the United States Environmental Protection Agency under contract number 68D00206 to ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc. It has been subjected to the Agency's peer and administrative review and has been approved for publication as an EPA document. "September 2002."
Contents Notes
Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) coupled with Energy-Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) is a powerful tool in the characterization and source apportionment of environmental particulate matter (PM), providing size, chemistry, and morphology of particles as small as a few tenths of a micrometer. Such information can reveal information about emission sources which cannot be determined through bulk chemical analysis. Automated SEMs capable of routinely analyzing hundreds of particles per hour have dramatically increased the throughput of SEM/EDX, making it feasible to conduct statistically meaningful analyses of PM samples and to generate large data sets for source apportionment studies. The National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) of the U.S. EPA has been developing and evaluating the use of SEM/EDX to characterize ambient and source-derived particles. The present document, which evolved over several years as a product of research carried out in support of the U.S. EPA/NERL SEM/EDX Laboratory, is intended to provide guidelines for researchers using SEM/EDX for aerosol characterization and source apportionment. Topics include laboratory procedures for sample handling, sample preparation, guidelines for successful manual and automated SEM/EDX analyses, data interpretation, issues relating to data quality and method validation and case studies highlighting the use of SEM/EDX in PM research