Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 477 OF 527

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title The trend of suspended particulates in urban air : 1957-1964 /
Author McMullen, Thomas B. ; Smit, R.
Other Authors
Author Title of a Work
Smith, Raymond
CORP Author Robert A. Taft Sanitary Engineering Center, Cincinnati, Ohio. Lab. of Engineering and Physical Sciences.
Publisher U.S. Dept. of Health, Education and Welfare, Public Health Service, Division of Air Pollution,
Year Published 1965
Report Number PHS PUB 999 AP 19
Stock Number PB-170 475
Subjects Air--Pollution--United States. ; Dust. ; Aerosols.
Additional Subjects ( Air pollution ; Particles) ; ( Dust ; Density) ; Samplers ; Collecting methods ; Statistical analysis ; Environment ; Urban areas ; Meteorological parameters
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB-170 475 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 01/01/1988
Collation v, 27 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Abstract
The trend toward lower average concentrations of suspended particulate pollution in the urban air in the United States from 1957 through 1963, indicated by measurements of the National Air Sampling Network, is investigated from three aspects: (1) statistical significance, (2) the validity of the sampling and analytical methods, and (3) relationship to environmental changes in the vicinity of the sampling stations. The evidence indicates that the decline is real and that the methods employed can reliably detect substantive changes in the concentration of suspended particulate pollution. Information on changes in the environments of a representative group of stations revealed that where significant decreases in suspended particulates occurred, they were often logically related to specific changes in source emissions. Thus the indicated decline in the suspended particulate portion of urban air pollution is verified and substantially accounted for. A statistically significant increase in the annual mean occurred in 1964; if continued, such an increase would suggest the possibility of cyclic influences. (Author)
Notes
Public Health Service publication no. 999-AP-19. Microfiche.