Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 39 OF 105

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Evaluation of perchloroethylene emissions from dry cleaned fabrics /
Author Tichenor, Bruce A.,
Other Authors
Author Title of a Work
Sparks, L. E.
Jackson, Merrill D.
Publisher U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Air and Energy Engineering Research Laboratory,
Year Published 1989
Report Number EPA/600-S2-88-061
OCLC Number 742052851
Subjects Ethylene compounds--Environmental aspects. ; Dry cleaning--Environmental aspects.
Internet Access
Description Access URL
https://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=2000TM17.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
EJBD ARCHIVE EPA 600-S2-88-061 In Binder Headquarters Library/Washington,DC 05/16/2018
EJBD  EPA 600-S2-88-061 In Binder Headquarters Library/Washington,DC 10/31/2018
Collation 1 sheet ([2] pages) ; 28 x 22 cm
Notes
Caption title. "Jan. 1989." "EPA/600-S2-88-061." At head of title: Project summary. Distributed to depository libraries in microfiche.
Contents Notes
"A study was conducted to evaluate the emissions of perchloroethylene (perc) from dry cleaned fabrics to determine: a) how the introduction of fresh dry cleaning Into a home affects the indoor concentration of perc, and b) the effectiveness of "airing out" for reducing perc emissions. Small chamber tests were conducted to determine perc emission characteristics for three fabrics at several temperatures and air exchange rates. Test house studies were conducted to determine the indoor concentration of perc due to the placement of dry cleaned clothing in the house. Based on the study results, and assuming the test conditions were representative of normal dry cleaning and consumer practices, it is concluded that 1) Emissions from freshly dry cleaned clothing cause elevated levels of perchloroethylene in residences, and 2) For the three fabrics tested, "airing out" of dry cleaned clothing by consumers will not be effective In reducing perchloroethylene emissions. Significant variations in dry cleaning practices and/or in the mix of fabrics and clothing being cleaned could provide different results and conclusions."